“This is what others have found….”  Third-party testimony is believable.

This is what others have found….”  Third-party testimony is believable.

  Jack Falvey

“Who said so?” is a question you should answer whether it is asked or not. 

We are so full of all the answers we sometimes forget to add the credibility factor to the equation by quoting others rather than ourselves.

Proprietary information from other businesses is off limits, but telling people how or why others they may respect use your product or service puts things in a very different light. 

By the nature of your work, customers know you have a vested interest in the sale.  That’s legitimate, and it doesn’t affect your credibility as an expert in your field, but someone without a vested interest in the process adds a factor that often can make the difference in a marginal situation.

You can often share information on where your product is under consideration or test, and that data, while not a firm third-party testimonial, will send the message that you are qualified to go to bat in the big leagues. 

Name dropping is part of what we do for a living.  The bigger the name, the better. 

Just make sure that everything you say is one hundred percent gold-plated truth.  Gaining trust on the names and reputations of others is ethical, but take care to share all facts and details.

Go to our website:   www.ncmalliance.com

 

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