So what exactly is a phishing email anyway?

So what exactly is a phishing email anyway

Please read the following carefully, then answer the question below.

You’ve probably heard or read about phishing attacks in relation to cybercrime, but maybe you don’t quite understand what they are or why they’re dangerous. So allow us to explain.

Creating a lookalike copy of someone else’s website is surprisingly easy. Just as you can take a Microsoft Word document, change a few key sentences and then pass it off as your own work, so you can do with a website. There are even programs that will allow criminals to clone an existing web site in just a few minutes.

Equally, criminals send fake, bogus emails that appear to come from one company but actually originate from somewhere else.

These inherent weaknesses in the internet allow phishing attacks to take place. Here’s how it works. The hackers create a clone of, say, a bank’s website. Not the entire site, but just the pages that ask you to sign in. Then they send out emails, appearing to come from the same bank, stating that there’s a problem with your account and that you need to log into your account to fix it. Helpfully, there’s a link in the email that takes you straight to the bank’s website. Except, of course, that the link takes you to the cloned version!

So when you log into the bank site in order to fix the problem, you’re actually sending your details straight to the hackers. Who then use them to empty your account.

Phishing attacks don’t just target banks. They also target other sites that are financially attractive such as Amazon and Paypal, as well as email accounts (so that the hackers can use them to send out spam to other people).

It’s a simple trick but thousands of people fall for it every day across the world. So always be on your guard.

Got that? Prove it with a quick quiz.

There’s a problem with your bank account, and the bank has sent you an email to notify you. It seems that your account may have been used by fraudsters so you need to log into your account in order to confirm your identity. The email contains a direct link to the bank, for convenience. What should you do in this instance?

A.  Reply to the email and ask for further details.

B.   Visit the bank’s site by typing the address manually into your browser.

C.   Click the link. Chances are it’ll be OK.

Go to our website:   www.ncmalliance.com

 

A.   “Criminals can send fake, bogus emails that appear to come from one company but actually originate from somewhere else.”

C.    “When you log into the bank site in order to fix the problem, you’re actually sending your details straight to the hackers. Who then use them to empty your account.”

 

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