10 Tips to Take Your Email Marketing from Good to Great

After all the effort that you invest in your email copy, hitting the publish button makes you feel hopeful and relieved. But what happens when your email marketing stats start to turn up? Do you notice that the results are not as good as what you had expected?

Do the click-through rates disappoint you?

If this sounds like you, here are ten tips that you can use to transform your email marketing and help you generate better results.

#1. Give Your List a Spring Cleaning

No matter how big your email list is, what ultimately counts is what percentage of that list is truly interested in hearing from you. It’s important to take the time to clean your list of those email addresses that don’t open your emails anymore. Keep only those subscribers that you think are likely to use your product or service one day in the future. Also, make it easy for people to unsubscribe whenever they like.

#2. Send Emails Before or After Work Hours

During work hours, most people are usually busy with their work day and don’t always have time to read newsletters. Multiple studies reveal that emails sent during work hours hardly get answered. So, if you have the chance to catch someone on off hours when they are more likely to open your mail this can be a good strategy.

#3. Keep the Subject Line Short

How many words does the subject line of your email contain? If it’s as long as a sentence, you may not get great results. The optimal length for a subject line is around 4-5 words. Use the first paragraph (see #5 below) to expand upon the subject line relevance, while keeping the subject as short as possible.

#4. Address Recipients by Name

Unless your subscriber base is a formal one, you should begin your email copy with the first name of the prospect. Leave out titles like Mr. or Dear. Think that you’re writing to a friend or colleague.

#5. Make the First 20 Words Relevant

The first paragraph of your email is crucial. In most inboxes, the email list displays four elements – 1) the sender info 2) the subject line 3) time when email was sent and 4) the first 20 words of the email. Make sure your first 20 words reinforce the subject line.

#6. Make the Customer the Hero of Your Email

A marketing email isn’t about you. It’s about prospects – their career, their business and their customers. Try to make the entire copy of your email revolve around what interests prospects, not what interests you.

#7. Keep Away from Unnecessary Jargon

Most prospects quit reading an email as soon as they stumble across abbreviations or technical terms they are not familiar with. For example, the term “CRO” is only popular among savvy digital marketers and web analysts. Generally, it means “converting visitors into customers”.

#8. Don’t Grandstand

Self-praise will not go down well with people who are not familiar with you. If you claim you are the best in your field or boast you sold 10,000 products last month, recipients will become suspicious. Most people know when something sounds too good to be true, it usually is.

#9. Kickstart a Conversation

If you try to sell too much, you will hardly sell. Unless you are marketing consumer products, the intent of email marketing is to strike up a conversation with the prospect, not to sell to the prospect. Focus on exchanging messages first and then request an appointment or phone call.

#10. Stick to a Single Call To Action

Having too many calls to action is proven to drive away prospects. What is your primary goal when you send email to a prospect? You want them to reply to your email, right? That is should be your call to action.

These tips above are just a few of a much larger list, but we found that these seem to be the most often overlooked by marketers and business owners when preparing and sending out emails. If you can keep these in mind as you prepare and send your future emails you should certainly see a nice increase in your open rates and overall engagement.

Go to our website:   www.ncmalliance.com

One comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s